Monthly Archives: February 2012

Big Fat Colour Post – how to find colour inspiration for your wedding

Colourful booklet wedding invitations

At some point it has to happen, when planning a wedding sooner or later you’re going to have finalise a colour scheme and sometimes it’s the stationery that forces that decision especially if you’re using Save the Date cards. At other times it might be the flowers, brides maid dresses, cake or other items that make you finally settle on one idea.

Perhaps the people who have it easiest are those who have a favourite colour that their partner either agrees or at least doesn’t vehemently dislike or could be persuaded to. There’s no doubt this is what they want to use and indecisive individuals such as me are very jealous as it avoids lots of pondering, reflection and second guessing. If this is the position you find yourself in you probably just have to decide if you want to use any other colours with your main colour. This can be very effective and should be considered and I’ll list later some resources that really could help. You may want to wait for the second of my articles on colour called matching colours for geeks.

Seasonal Inspiration
The seasons or rather the alleged/supposed seasons as well we all know in the UK they have a habit of not really living up to their stereo types, especially when the hottest day of the year is in the Autumn. But the short comings of British weather aside the seasons of Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter can be a very good basis for a wedding colour scheme. It’s a little like chefs saying by what’s in season – although from an environmental point of view your colour choices are far less likely to be of any consequence over buying something grown locally or that’s flown in from far away.

Spring
Spring is about freshness and new life. You have a lot of light natural colours but they’re not full on or primary as life although on the up is probably delicate and still on the edge while the mornings can see the odd frost and misty mornings are still quite common. So pastel greens, blues, pinks, yellows are very good and appropriate. You could also base your decisions on flowers that typically flower at this time, especially for a very natural feeling wedding.

Summer
Summer in many ways is the pinnacle of the year, when life is at its fullest and most vital. The weather should in theory be sunny, flowers should abound and the sky should mostly blue and not grey. It is the time of year when you can be most full on with colours and wield primary greens, blues, pinks, oranges, and yellows. So it’s basically like spring without needing to be so muted – although there’s nothing wrong if you do want to tone them down a bit and use more pastel versions.

Autumn
Autumn is really a time of change which to my mind is quite transient and short lived as summer can last until October really and when that’s the case you can go from 30 degree sunshine to 0 degrees at night really quickly and I often think that Autumn is really just the time between when it’s definitely Summer and when it’s definitely Winter oh and in some places the leaves fall off the tree and it’s quite pretty! It’s the leaves falling off the tree which forms the basis for many an autumn colour scheme. So we’re talking oranges, reds, yellows and browns, not quite primary and maybe a bit darker. You also have berries coming in season at this time to.

Winter
This is perhaps the best time of year to get married from the point of view from choice of seasonal colour schemes. Christmas being at this time of year adds another lot of choices if your wedding is in December or late November. Ignoring Christmas briefly you have two ways of going. Essentially outside or inside – if that doesn’t make sense I shall explain. Outside, as in outside the home it’s of course a very cold time of year – we’ll ignore that it’s normally mild, wet and grey. So frosty colours do well, like very pale blues or even white for snow. Inside though it’s a time of fire and warmth and wrapping up. Dark reds or firey colours can come to the fore. If you add in xmas suddenly you can choose really rich colours like purples, reds like the colour of mulled wine, gold and silver being a decadent time of the wear.

What you like
As a designer sometimes I like a challenge and you might want to base your colour scheme on what you and your partner both like. Think about something you have in common and the colours that might be associated with it. When I mention a challenge the challenge with this is to take an idea not really based on colour and find a way to bring it to life as colours for your weddings. An easy example would be the sea. You have a multitude of blues and bluey greens, greys and white from breaking waves. If you decide beaches, it’s blues, yellows and any colour that you think sand or pebbles can be and maybe palm trees if you’re thinking of tropical beaches. Or what if your into diving – colours from coral reefs. There’s so much that can be done! Like starting with a favourite drink like wine, white, rose or red. There’s chocolate or even hot chocolate. I quite like the idea of creamy browns and marshmallowy pinks or whites.

Look around
If you’re not keen on a favourite colour or don’t have one. Don’t want to base it on the seasons and you haven’t come with anything appealing by thinking about what you like without resorting to very geeky methods in the next section then essentially you need to keep your eyes open. Look for inspiration anywhere, in gardens or the high street, wedding magazines and blogs, well in fact any magazines and blogs. Websites also often have carefully thought out colour schemes where someone else has done the hard work. You can find lists of good looking websites online to like this one. http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/galleries/blog-design-showcase/

Example text for wedding invitations coming from the Brides parents

Genoa Bifold Wedding Invitations

The following are suggestions on how you can word wedding invitations if the invitation is coming from the Bride’s parents. This is normally the case when the Bride’s parents are paying for most of the wedding or where there is a strong wish to use more traditional text.

There is a mixture of including church ceremonies and the venue hosting the marriage ceremony, you should add or exclude these details as is appropriate.

If an rsvp is being enclosed it may not be necessary to mention the rsvp section as those details may be on the separate RSVP.

Example 1.

Mr and Mrs John (Brides Father Firstname) Smith (Brides Parents Surname)
request the pleasure of the company of
Guest(s) Name(s)
at the marriage of their daughter
Joanne Smith (Brides First Name & Middle Names)
to
Mr Jonathan Paul Wood (Grooms first name, middle names and surname)
at St. Pauls Church, Yeovil (Church name and location)
on Saturday 9th June 2012 (Date and Year)
at 12:30pm (time)
and afterwards at Park Hotel, Sherborne (location of reception)
carriages at midnight (end time)

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 2.

Mr and Mrs John (Brides Father Firstname) Smith (Brides Parents Surname)
would be delighted if
Guest(s) Name(s)
would join them at the marriage of their daughter
Joanne Smith (Brides First Name & Middle Names)
to
Mr Jonathan Paul Wood (Grooms first name, middle names and surname)
at St. Pauls Church, Yeovil (Church name and location)
on Saturday 9th June 2012 (Date and Year)
at 12:30pm (time)
and afterwards at Park Hotel, Sherborne (location of reception)
carriages at midnight (end time)

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 3.

Mr and Mrs John (Brides Father Firstname) Smith (Brides Parents Surname)
would be delighted if
Guest(s) Name(s)
would join them in celebrating the marriage of their daughter
Joanne Smith (Brides First Name & Middle Names)
To
Jonathan Paul Wood (Grooms first name, middle names and surname)
on Saturday 9th June 2012 (Date and Year)
at the Park Hotel, Sherborne (venue) at 12:30pm (time)
ending at midnight (end time)

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 4.

Guest(s) Name(s)
Mr and Mrs John (Brides Father Firstname) Smith (Brides Parents Surname)
would be delighted if you would join them in
celebrating the marriage of their daughter
Joanne Smith (Brides First Name & Middle Names)
to
Jonathan Paul Wood (Grooms first name, middle names and surname)
on Saturday 9th June 2012 (Date and Year)
at the Park Hotel, Sherborne (venue) at 12:30pm (time)
ending at midnight (end time)

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example text for Invitations from the Bride and Groom

Sassari mounted A5 Invitation

The following are suggestions on how you can word an invitation if the invitation is coming from the Bride and Groom. This is normally the case when the Bride and Groom are paying for most of the wedding their selves or when family politics such as a bitter divorce means mentioning the parents is best avoided for fear of upset.

There is a mixture of including church ceremonies and the venue hosting the marriage ceremony, you should add or exclude these details as is appropriate.

If an rsvp is being enclosed it may not be necessary to mention the rsvp section as those details may be on the separate RSVP.

Example 1.
Guest(s) name(s)
Bride’s name
and
Groom’s name
request the pleasure of your company to celebrate their marriage
on Day Date, Month, Year
at Name of Venue at time

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 2.
Bride’s name
and
Groom’s name
Request the pleasure of the company of
Guest(s) names(s)
To attend their wedding and reception
to be celebrated at Time, Day, Date, Month, Year at Venue

Please RSVP by Date
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 3.
Bride’s name and Groom’s name

Request the pleasure of the company of
Guest(s) name(s)
on their wedding day.

At Venue, Road, Town/City

On Saturday 10th September 2011 at 1pm

Reception to follow at Venue, Road, Town or city

We would be honoured to have you with us on our wedding day
Please RSVP by August 10th 2011
Name and address of who to send it to and where

Example 4.
Bride’s name
and
Groom’s name
Would like to invite
Guest(s) name(s)
To join them at their wedding ceremony
On Day, Date, Month, Year at Time
Church Name
Church Address
Followed by drinks, dinner and dancing at
Venue Name
Venue Address

Ideas for Booklet, Trifold, Pocketfold and Bifold Wedding Invitation Content

Inside of Reggio Emilia Bifold Invitation showing invitation wording and information

Ideas for Booklet, Trifold and other Wedding Invitation Content

Booklets and Trifold Invitations as well as pocket folds are fantastic looking Invitations which many people choose because they want to present a lot of information to their guests. This article will take you through the typical information that people often put in their invites. Also there are suggestions for when you want to use this type of Invitation but don’t know additional ideas for inclusion in the Invite.

Trifold cards typically have three internal panels for information and ours come with an additional detachable RSVP giving you a total of four areas to fill. Although on our Trifold cards you could also put something on the second cover as you have the external cover you open first and then a second internal cover before getting to the three internal panels. Booklet Invitations typically have a cover and then three additional pages, although there are versions with an extra page.

Typical Information

The Invitation
No one should forget this bit it’s the truly essential bit of the invite!

Location
You may be able to put directions or a map into your invite. Although some suppliers will charge extra for doing a map, you also need to remember that you cannot use copyrighted maps so one will have to be drawn for you or maybe by you unless you purchase the right to reproduce the map you want to use. This means the maps will often be simplified so it pays to think about what is the main information you need to convey and which directions your guests will be coming from. In the UK if near a motorway it’s a good idea to show the motorway junction that’s best to use. This is where it can be useful that you are creating it as it doesn’t have to be strictly to scale.

RSVP
This might be an actual RSVP which can be detached or at least a section detailing how to rsvp, the date you want to receive it by and the information you require. At its simplest this is where you want people to say if they’re coming. Other information that can be required depends on the wedding. For the wedding reception you may want to know if anyone has any special dietary requirements and if there is a menu choice you will need to see who wants to order what. If accommodation is available, depending on how the accommodation is being arranged you may wish to ask who wishes to book it.

Gift List or other Gift Arrangements
If you have a gift list in a store or online this is quite simple as you just need to give the relevant details. The store or website you have used will tell you exactly what information is needed to pass on. It’s also a good chance to explain that if you’re after money why you’re not wanting toasters and other utensils. There’s nothing wrong with being honest as most people will want to make sure whatever they give you is wanted. You might say something like you’ve been living together for several years and have most things involved in setting up home but such and such would be useful as you are planning…. Etc.

Accommodation
If you have guests coming from other areas of the country, from abroad or even if you just think people want to stay at or near the venue after the wedding you should think about giving information on where to stay. You may need to suggest cheap venues for people travelling on a budget or those who just want a bed for the night. Guests from abroad might want sign posting to places which will give them a good experience of the country. Other guests may want to celebrate through the night and so be keen to stay at the venue or where ever the majority of the wedding guests are staying. If places in the venue are limited you may want a say on who gets them so it may be wise to tie them in with the RSVP as you may want to give first opportunity to closer friends or family.

Menu
If you are having a choice at the wedding or before it will be a good idea to inform your guests what the choices may be. It’s also a good opportunity to ask people to let you know any special dietary requirements.

Not so typical

The first thing to say is be inventive, they are your invitations so what you say should go. If you are unsure about part or all of the get either family or close friends to help develop your ideas.

Poems and Text
Why not include a romantic poem or one on a theme which is relevant to the day. Text or verse can look very attractive incorporated into the design of a wedding invitation and it can also set the mood for the day. If you have written the poem yourself or know the author and have their permission (there may be conditions) then you’re free to reproduce the poem. Otherwise you may wish to choose one on which the copyright has expired (see link for guidance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright#Copyright_term). If a poem is not appealing you could write a short bit about the proposal or how you met or something about the wedding day to come. This may be written in the style of a news-paper article or a story or you could include a simple personal message. This could say something like how much your looking forward to the wedding, that you think you have found a lovely venue which all your guests will enjoy and really want as many of your friends and relatives there as possible to celebrate with you on your wedding day.

Pictures
You will probably want to stick to something relevant to the wedding. A picture of the bride and groom is always good, this could be processed to make it look black or white or like a painting if you don’t want a standard colour photo in your invitation. Other choices maybe something involved in the wedding like the venue or the type of flowers you’re having. There are similar copyright issues as listed above and even if you take the photo yourself you may still not have copyright, for example if you have taken a picture of the venue you should check with them first. Similarly though even if the picture is of you the copyright may be held by the person who took the photo if a professional photographer.

Posting Wedding Invites and Cards in the UK

Posting can be a confusing process in the United Kingdom, especially as the rules have changed in recent times which many people may not fully understand if they don’t post different shaped items often. The aim of this article is to help people posting items like wedding invitations think about the best way to send their invitations. I’ve been involved in running a wedding stationery business for several years in which time I have learnt a lot about posting items both nationally and internationally.

The first thing to say is that if you have a traditional folded card that is not especially thick (less than 5mm when in an envelope) and less than 16.5 cm on the shortest side and 24 cm on the longest then you are probably fine to use a standard 1st or 2nd class stamp as your card will qualify as a standard letter. This means a C5 envelope is about the largest size you can send. These are the envelopes normally used for an A5 card (the same size as an a4 piece of paper folded in half). The only thing to note is that items getting nearer the 5 mm thickness may be marked or dented when going through the sorting machinery so you may wish to consider one of the options listed later to provide some protection to the invitation.  If your not sure if your card falls into this category it’s maybe a good idea to take a card in it’s envelope to a post office, there are normally plastic postal checkers somewhere within you can try your invitation on.  If there’s not one accessible to customers the staff should definitely have one and should be happy to help.

When posting larger cards where the thickness is near or more than 5mm or where there is elaborate decoration on the front such as bows, crystals, flowers or other decorations then you will probably want to send them in something that will provide protection to stop the decoration being damaged.  Though we have found properly attached crystals can go through the post without additional protection than the envelope.  The most economical way to do this is to use posting boxes. These provide a hard protection around the invitation. The great thing about posting boxes is you can buy sizes which still count as a letter or large letter. To qualify as a large letter items must be less than 25 cm on the short side and on the 35.3cm longest side with a total thickness under 2.5cm. There is a weight limit of 750 grams; we rarely exceed 250 grams when sending our samples. The price of postage changes by weight, under 100 grams being the cheapest, under 250 gram the next price tier. As at Feb 2011 the price for under 100 grams was £0.90 and £0.69  for 1st and 2nd class respectively.  For between 100 grams and 250 grams it is £1.20 1st and £1.10 2nd.

Choosing posting boxes, we find by far the most durable to be made of single walled card board, if it’s just a card box they look nice but are too easily squashed. Searching for pricing in proportion or PIP postal boxes can be done through Google. They normally come in a brown card but are not the most aesthetically pleasing; however you could do a large label to cover most of one side of the box.  Much like we do for samples.  The main thing to do is get the invite there in one piece.