Now when you read vintage you might well think oh no not more vintage.  Which is fair enough it has been very pervasive these last couple of years.  But though this article’s title is lazily lumping them all under the same banner as vintage fonts, there is a tonne of different styles that fall under the general vintage banner. I do want to showcase fonts that I think are well worth considering whether vintage is currently cool or the equivalent of the shellsuit trend from the 90’s.

As far as I can tell, people have used vintage to cover anything from the 80’s right back to the Victorian era.  This is fairly broad I’ll admit so I’m going to break the vintage fonts I want to share today down into a few groups.

Most of the fonts are ones available to choose from Artemis Stationery but all the typewriter fonts can be freely found online for all uses (I believe – please check the licence though in case I’m wrong).

Starting with Carnival or fairground.  The styling of fairs and travelling carnivals, like most Punch and Judy shows, I think harks back to bygone ages when such things were much more popular.  Beneath are three fonts which I think fit a fairground or carnival theme perfectly and in the case of Rosewood has been used  many, many times for that purpose.

Fonts for a carnival themed occasion
Fonts for a carnival themed occasion

This is an image of our fairground inspired design using the font Algerian.

Carnival Postcard Save the Date
Carnival Postcard Save the Date

Next we have open face (and similar) fonts.  Take one look and I don’t think I really need to explain why they’re called open face.  They remind me of a time when shop signs were hand painted, such signs would take longer to make due to the complexity of the font.  Today I think they add extra interest and reinforce a font’s vintage pedigree.  If I associate this with any particular age to my mind they’re before the First World War and back to the Victorian Era.  The Victorian period had a lot of elegance but at the same time vast and heavy industry including printing presses.

Open face and similar fonts
Open face and similar fonts

Serifs are those little bits of details on a font that makes fonts like Times New Roman look like they have received some decoration as opposed to fonts like Arial which just have the strokes they need to form the letters.  Serif fonts including Times New Roman I think are actually pretty vintage in themselves and good for simulating type writers which are pretty vintage now in themselves!  Although typewriters did make it to nearly the end of the last century.  I’m including serif fonts in this as I think some have some really interesting looks and to be honest you can’t far wrong with Times New Roman which strikes a very good balance I think between style and ease of reading.  The only thing counting against it maybe it’s popularity and its regular use.

Serif vintage fonts
Serif vintage fonts

Finally we’re going for type writer fonts.  So called because they simulate the not quite perfect nature of a type writer where the ribbon hasn’t quite got all the ink it needs.  They’re really good for creating a worn vintage look.

Type writer fonts
Type writer fonts

If you want to see how Artemis Stationery uses different fonts in our bespoke stationery either check out our Facebook page which shows many stationery photos or visit the Artemis Stationery website and see all of our unique and original stationery ranges.

 Update (11th Feb 2013):  if you are looking for more wide-ranging font ideas and inspiration please check out this article I’ve since had published on the English Wedding Blog.